Lapis Lazuli

Lapis is a beautiful rock; an aggregate of several minerals, mainly lazurite, calcite, and pyrite.

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ABOUT LAPIS LAZULI

This ancient rock is an aggregate of several minerals. The three major minerals that comprise lapis are lazurite, calcite, and pyrite. The rock can also contain lesser amounts of diopside, amphibole, feldspar, or mica. Lazurite is the ingredient responsible for producing the gem’s most prized color—bright royal blue.


WHY WE LOVE THIS GEMSTONE

ANCIENT

Lapis was treasured by the ancient civilizations of Mesopotamia, Egypt, China, Greece, and Rome.

GLITTER

Golden flecks of pyrite create a sparkle in lapis lazuli.

MARCO POLO

In 1271, Marco Polo described ancient Bactria’s lapis mines.

 

EXQUISITE COLOR

From ancient times to the present, many civilizations have prized lapis lazuli for its exquisite deep blue color.

6,500 YEARS

Scholars of ancient civilizations believe that the link between man and lapis lazuli stretches back beyond 6,500 years.

ULTRAMARINE

Renaissance painters used lapis to make “ultramarine” blue, an expensive pigment of unrivaled brightness and stability.


QUALITY FACTORS

Lapis lazuli is valued for its dark blue to violetish blue color.

CUT Lapis is typically cut into cabochons, beads, inlays, or tablets.

CUT
Lapis is typically cut into cabochons, beads, inlays, or tablets.

COLOR The gem’s most-prized color is a uniform dark blue to violetish blue, without any visible calcite.

COLOR
The gem’s most-prized color is a uniform dark blue to violetish blue, without any visible calcite.

CLARITY Top-quality lapis can display small, attractively distributed, gold-colored flecks of pyrite.

CLARITY
Top-quality lapis can display small, attractively distributed, gold-colored flecks of pyrite.

CARAT WEIGHT Lapis rough can be large enough to fashion into decorative carvings.

CARAT WEIGHT
Lapis rough can be large enough to fashion into decorative carvings.